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ScojoDak
Dodge Dakota
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4/21/2003
15:08:08

Subject: Aviation fuel
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Anyone ever use it in their 99 5.2 with the usual intake/exhaust mods? Do's and dont's? Experiences? Opinions?



CThomp
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4/21/2003
15:12:42

RE: Aviation fuel
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That would probably be a dumb thing to do to your engine. You'll burn something up using that high of an octane fuel. Plus yer engine will probably run like crap



Daksmack
Dodge Dakota
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4/21/2003
15:22:37

RE: Aviation fuel
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Actually aviation fuel is basically 100 octane or so (I used to work at an airport). Ever used 104 octane booster? You might be thinking of jet fuel. Def dont use that. Its more of a diesel fuel. But Av fuel, sure have at it.



Daddy-D
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4/21/2003
16:37:58

RE: Aviation fuel
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Don't do it!
Even with my little 1835cc VW pocket rocket with 10.5:1 compression, I burned valves and scorched pistons.
Trying a half a tank might not do any harm if you cannot resist the compulsion to try it, but you will be disappointed. It will damage valves and/or pistons over time or hard driving.

'98 DakSport C/C 3.9 2WD A/T

mason
Dodge Dakota
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4/21/2003
17:14:12

RE: Aviation fuel
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Aviation fuel is leaded and may cause problems later.



Evil Doer
Dodge Dakota
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4/21/2003
17:26:36

RE: Aviation fuel
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There's really nothing to be gained by running higher octane unless you have a very high compression engine.

100 octane doesn't make any more power than 89 octane.



MikeD
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4/21/2003
18:44:43

RE: Aviation fuel
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Like unleaded gas aviation fuel has different octanes but even though it'd make your octane higher it might not run right because it wasn't designed to run on that type of fuel.

You can use a higher octane unleaded race gas to get the higher octane. But Evil Doer I'd have to disagree w/ you a slightly higher octane raises the combustion and the more combustion the greater the HP.

~Mike~

Get In...Sit Down...Shutup...& Hangon

Billy
Dodge Dakota
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4/21/2003
18:54:04

RE: Aviation fuel
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Gas is gas their is no more power in 89 or
100 octane. The higher the octane number the
higher you can compress the charge without
pinging.



Kyle
Dodge Dakota
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4/21/2003
18:57:10

RE: Aviation fuel
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Just go to the 76 gas station and they sell 104 octane racing fuel out of the pump! Its not at all 76 stations though. Only 4 that i've seen.



Evil Doer
Dodge Dakota
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4/22/2003
07:00:36

RE: Aviation fuel
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Found this on the Shell Gasoline website....

Colin Britton, Advisor, Product Performance and Development, Fuels. "A fuel's octane rating is totally unrelated to power, and you're not getting top-end, rubber-burning power from higher octane gasoline unless your engine actually requires that octane rating."

A fuel's octane number is simply a numeric description of its ability to resist engine knocking. When unburned gasoline vapours spontaneously explode in the cylinder before the expanding flame in the combustion cylinder reaches them, it actually causes two simultaneous explosions (the other is from the spark plug). This results in a knocking or pinging sound.

The higher a fuel's octane number - or anti-knock index, which is a more accurate term - the higher its resistance to engine knock.

A car's engine is designed by its manufacturer for fuel of a particular octane number which is always specified in the owner's manual, says Britton. "Buying higher octane than recommended is simply a waste of money."

The one - and very important - exception is that when a vehicle gets older, says Britton, the build-up of fuel- and lubricant-related deposits can increase the fuel octane number a car requires to prevent engine knock. For this reason, if a car more than a couple of years old experiences engine knocking, the problem may be solved simply by moving to the gasoline blend with the next-higher anti-knock index.

Technically there are three different "octane numbers" associated with every gasoline. The Research Octane Number, or RON, is measured under fairly easy test conditions. The Motor Octane Number, or MON, is a tougher test measured at higher engine speed and temperature.

The value that relates most closely to actual driving conditions is the average of these two values: Road Octane Number = (RON + MON)/2.

Occasionally, less scrupulous gasoline outlets will use the confusion of these different octane measurements to exaggerate their octane rating claims, by advertising their fuel's Research Octane Number - which will be higher than the Road Octane Number. Motorists should always be sure that the octane number a vendor advertises is its Road Octane value, not its RON.






Educated_dude
Dodge Dakota
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4/22/2003
22:43:20

RE: Aviation fuel
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Most Avgas is 100LL (100 low-lead). Blue in
color. Also used to be able to get 103 (Green,
I think), and 90-something (Red). Designed for
a different set of working conditions than in
cars, has a bit more to it than just higher
octane, such as lead, as one poster mentioned.

Horribly expensive, and the octane rating of it
would not be usable unless you had a
high-performance motor, and the right computer
program to run it, and were pulling heavy loads
uphill in the middle of August, on Pike's Peak.
Funny thing is, lots of people were working on
modifying aircraft engines to be able to use
automotive gasoline, because it's so much
cheaper.



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