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Adam
Dodge Dakota
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7/04/2004
10:24:32

Subject: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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QUESTION: Can I just put on a some big rotors in the front without changing up anyting?



.boB
Dodge Dakota
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7/04/2004
12:45:00

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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No. If you increase the diameter of the rotors, you have to move the calipers out to match.

As for drilling and slotting, it's just for looks. It will actually decrease your braking performance by decreasing rotor surface area.



00 RT/BC
Dodge Dakota
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7/06/2004
15:04:02

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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I wouldn't say that slotted and or crossdrilled rotors are just for looks. By putting larger diameter slotted rotors on your vehicle you actually increase the braking surface but you also provide a way for hot gases created when braking to escape the brake area. This causes less brake fade as well as less chance of a runaway especially when decending a steep grade when towing.



00 RT/BC
Dodge Dakota
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7/06/2004
15:05:29

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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I wouldn't say that slotted and or crossdrilled rotors are just for looks. By putting larger diameter slotted rotors on your vehicle you actually increase the braking surface but you also provide a way for hot gases created when braking to escape the brake area. This causes less brake fade as well as less chance of a runaway especially when decending a steep grade when towing.



hybrid
Dodge Dakota
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7/06/2004
16:49:47

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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I have not tested this ( I run stock on my dakota and brembro blanks on my civic) but from what i've heard cross drilled and sloted rotors aid in braking because they allow the pads to run cooler. Also I've read that the material pads are made out of now do not emmit gasses, back in the old days they did, and the cross drilling/slotting would allow the gasses to escape thus eliminating the gas barrior between the pads and rotors. Elimintaion of the gasses allowed shorter breaking. Maybe the stuff i've read is innacurate ( i don't believe much stuff i read in magazines anyways) so I cant attest to this being true( I generally won't back up something I havent personally tested to be true). As far as largeer diameter goes, that does aid in braking due to the larger surface area, I will attest to that because the theory behind it has been proven time and time again....just be careful when swapping/upgrading braking parts, you need to do it in proportion, don't increase your front braking by 50% and leave the rear stock, you may end up making your stopping distance greater and your truck dangerous if you ever really need to slam on your brakes. i remember a long time ago people used to swap rear disk brakes from higher model civics or integra's onto base model civic (that came with rear drums), without touching the front (or the proportioning valve)...the end result was the rear tires locking up under hard braking....not a good way to stop your vehicle.



rtdkota
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7/06/2004
18:13:22

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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The powerslots and SSBC slotted rotors work much better than stock.

I sell both of them on my website, as well as the SSBC rear brake disc conversion kit.

Sam

619-274-1292



www.socaldakota.com

00 RT/BC
Dodge Dakota
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7/07/2004
12:03:33

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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Perhaps the hot gases might even just be the surrounding air which when heated will expand and since it has nowhere to go it might result in brake fade. Perhaps this is the case, perhaps not.



.boB
Dodge Dakota
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7/07/2004
23:17:33

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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These quotes came from the FAQ at Baer Brakes web site www.baer.com :

"In years past, crossdrilling and/or Slotting the rotor for racing purposes was beneficial by providing a way to expel the gasses created when the bonding agents employed to manufacture the pads began to break down at extreme temperatures. This condition is often referred to as “green pad fade” or “outgassing”. When it does occur, the driver still has a good firm brake pedal, but simply little or no friction. Since this normally happens only at temperatures witnessed in racing, this can be very exciting!"

"However, with today’s race pad technology, ‘outgassing’ is no longer much of a concern."

"Although crossdrilling and/or slotting will provide a welcome path to expend any gasses when and if they develop, it is primarily a visual enhancement behind today’s often wide-open wheel designs."


Your best brakeing will come from the largest amount of disc/pad contact area; simple physics. But cutting into the disc surface, you're decreasing the contact area - simple geometry.

If you want better cooling, run a cooling duct. It works better and it looks trick.

And Hybrid is exactly right. You must have balance in the force. 6 piston dynalites on the front don't match stock drums on the back.




DSW
Dodge Dakota
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7/08/2004
21:59:32

RE: Front Rotors / SLOT & CROSS
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I have Raybestos drilled and slotted rotors and they are far superior to stock or cheap aftermarket rotors. I tow a lot and was replacing/turning rotors every 6 months because the rotors would warp. I have had the Raybestos rotors on for 9 months and no signs of warping, even after towing my boat numerous times.

Is it the holes and slots making the rotors last longer or is it the better metal Raybestos uses for these rotors? Realy don't know or care as long as they don't warp like all the other rotors that have been on my truck in the past.



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